The Wagners - A Serious Injury Law Firm blog shares Personal Injury stories and opinions relevant to Halifax, Nova Scotia residents. Let us know what you think.

CEREBRAL PALSY: DIAGNOSIS

Victor Lewin
Wednesday, November 16, 2016

This Blog is the fifth in a series of posts on Cerebral Palsy (CP) and its relation to medical malpractice. To obtain more information on CP, please reference our previous blog posts.

Please do not hesitate to call Wagners if you have further questions about medical malpractice and CP and would like to consult with a lawyer. Wagners has extensive experience in medical malpractice and complex litigation, and has represented clients throughout Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and PEI. Wagners has been successful in many birth trauma cases, and has obtained for its clients the much needed and lifelong financial support for families with children of CP.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of CP is based on the child’s development over time. Physicians, particularly pediatricians, are responsible for monitoring a child’s developmental advancement and growth benchmarks. A general movements assessment, which involves measuring movements that occur spontaneously among those less than four months of age, is an oft-used method for diagnosing CP.

Further diagnostic tests, such as blood tests and medical imaging, may be used to rule out other possible causes, and abnormal results can help to detect a high likelihood of associated conditions, such as epilepsy and intellectual disability.

Time is of the essence: an early diagnosis of CP is critical for maximizing a child’s ability to expand their capabilities and lifelong potential. An early diagnosis can lead to necessary interventions that will help a child diagnosed with CP master everyday tasks, increase mobility and improve their quality of life. Early interventions will be in the form of whatever therapies and treatments a child may need, and can address movement, cognitive development, social interaction, and behavior.

The family of an individual with CP is likely to incur significant expenses related to the ongoing need for medical care, special education services, developmental assistance, and assisted living. Other factors, including occupational limitations and the indirect costs of lost productivity and wages, also contribute to the overall expense.

If you suspect that medical malpractice may have played a role in your child’s CP, Wagners may be able to seek compensation for the losses incurred by you and your family, including pain and suffering, medical expenses, and past and future treatment costs.

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CEREBRAL PALSY: CLASSIFICATIONS

Victor Lewin
Wednesday, November 09, 2016

This Blog is the fourth in a series of posts on Cerebral Palsy (CP) and its relation to medical malpractice. To obtain more information on CP, please reference our previous blog posts.

Please do not hesitate to call Wagners if you have further questions about medical malpractice and CP and would like to consult with a lawyer. Wagners has extensive experience in medical malpractice and complex litigation, and has represented clients throughout Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and PEI. Wagners has been successful in many birth trauma cases, and has obtained for its clients the much needed and lifelong financial support for families with children of CP.

What are the Different Types of Cerebral Palsy?

There are three main CP classifications by motor impairment: spastic, ataxic, and dyskinetic. Additionally, there is a mixed type that shows a combination of features of the other types. These classifications reflect the areas of the brain that are damaged.

(a) Spastic Cerebral Palsy is by far the most common type of CP, occurring in upwards of 70% of all cases. It results from damage to the motor cortex of the brain. The almost exclusive impairment present is spasticity (muscle tightness), which often leads to a very early onset of muscle stress symptoms like arthritis and tendinitis. Occupational therapy and physical therapy regimens of assisted stretching, strengthening, functional tasks, and/or targeted physical activity and exercise are the primary ways to manage spastic CP.

(b) Ataxic Cerebral Palsy affects coordinated movements. Fine motor skills such as writing, typing, or using scissors might be affected, as well as balance and posture, especially while walking. Control of eye movements and depth perception can be impaired. Ataxic CP does not produce involuntary movements, but instead indicates impaired balance and coordination.

(c) Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy is separated further into two different groups; athetoid and dystonic. Athetoid Cerebral Palsy is mixed muscle tone — hypertonia and hypotonia mixed with involuntary motions, especially in the arms, legs, and hands. Dystonia/Dystonic Cerebral Palsy includes cases that affect the trunk muscles more than the limbs and results in a fixed, twisted posture. People with Dyskinetic CP have trouble holding themselves in an upright, steady position for sitting or walking, and often show involuntary motions. The brain damage occurs to the extrapyramidal motor system and/or pyramidal tract and to the basal ganglia. In newborn infants, high bilirubin levels in the blood, if left untreated, can lead to brain damage in the basal ganglia (kernicterus), which can lead to Dyskinetic CP.

(d) Mixed Cerebral Palsy displays symptoms of dyskinetic, ataxic and spastic CP appearing simultaneously, each to varying degrees, and both with and without symptoms of each.

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Who has to prove fault in a motor vehicle accident?

Victor Lewin
Monday, November 07, 2016

Typically the individual or claimant bringing forward a case for personal injuries has burden to prove that the defendant is at fault for the accident. The claimant needs to prove on a balance of probabilities (i.e. 51% chance) the defendant caused the accident. In law, this is referred to as the onus of proof.  ..

Essure Permanent Birth Control System

Victor Lewin
Monday, November 07, 2016

In 2001, Health Canada approved the use of a medical device that would alleviate the need for women to undergo a procedure to prevent unwanted pregnancy. The device, touted as a permanent birth control measure, is known as the Essure Permanent Birth Control System and is manufactured by the German-based Bayer HealthCare AG, one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies. Before the device was approved and made available, an invasive procedure known as tubal ligation was the usual course of action to permanently prevent pregnancy.  ..

Heart Surgery Infection: Heater/Cooler Infections Found in Canada

Victor Lewin
Tuesday, November 01, 2016

Two major Canadian hospitals have begun the process of notifying thousands of their patients who have undergone open-heart surgery since 2012 of the possible risk of contracting non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) from heater-cooler devices that are used to control a patient’s blood temperature during surgery.  ..